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Geelong & The Bellarine

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Highlights

SEAROAD FERRIES QUEENSCLIFF

Searoad Ferries connects the Great Ocean Road and the Bellarine to the Mornington Peninsula, the 40 minute crossing is a stress free alternative to driving through the city. Two specially designed all weather 60 metre ferries have easy drive on/drive off facilities, spacious comfortable lounges with full-length windows, a tempting cafe and plenty of deck space. Watch out for dolphins, whales in winter and enormous ships as you breathe incredibly fresh air. Arriving at Sorrento, you will have a perfect view of multi-million dollar mansions sitting atop cliffs, tiny coves filled with boats, the beautiful foreshore and old limestone buildings. Whether you are going home or on a journey far away, there's no better way to see the bay than with Searoad Ferries. Passengers with vehicles are advised to arrive at the terminals at least 20 minutes prior to departure. The ferries depart from Queenscliff Harbour, Queenscliff and the Sorrento Pier, Sorrento. Special Features on the 40 minute journey are the unparalleled views of historic lighthouses, the Point Nepean fortifications, navigational features, seals and dolphins are available from the comfortable lounge areas, cafe style seating or numerous observation decks. Both vessels are fully equipped to cater for passengers with disabilities, including an internal lift from the vehicle deck to the passenger lounge. Coaches may be booked ahead. Seven days notice is advisable to secure passage.

You Yangs

Rising from the flat, volcanic plains between Geelong and Melbourne, the granite peaks of the You Yangs are a terrific destination for many outdoor activities. Walk to Flinders Peak for panoramic views of Geelong, Corio Bay, the Western Districts and beyond. There are several walking tracks within the park catering for varying abilities. The You Yangs are popular for mountain biking; the two designated mountain bike areas offer 50km of track. The park is also popular for rock climbing, abseiling and horse riding and there are BBQ and picnic areas available, as well as toilets.

Beacon Bus Tours and Charter

As part of BIG4 Beacon Resort's offering, Beacon Bus Tours & Charter are able to provide personalised transfers to and from venues or predetermined locations in a 11 seater bus for both guests and visitors alike. Beacon Bus Tours & Charter can also arrange and personalise boutique tour options. The Beacon Bus Tours & Charter service is also open to other local accommodation providers to guarantee visitors receive the best possible experience during their stay in the Bellarine region. Beacon Bus Tours & Charter has an experienced tour guide who has been working as a tour guide both internationally and domestically for more than 25 years. He has developed itineraries and lead tours in many parts of the world however has most recently been developing and leading food, wine and history tours of the Yarra Valley, Mornington and Geelong areas. Beacon Bus Tours & Charter know you will enjoy local knowledge as much as other visitors do. Please contact Beacon Bus Tours & Charter services for further information or customised itineraries and recommendations within the Geelong Bellarine area.

VIP Bus

VIP Bus is the ultimate luxury transport. With perimeter seating for 30 people with a Flat Screen TV, Huge Touch Screen Sound System, Air Con, Toilet, BYO Liquor Licence and Red Carpet Boarding. Consider VIP Bus for your Corporate transport with a difference and an experience that your clients will never forget. VIP Bus also provides VIP service for Weddings, Birthday, Formals, Debs, Sport Events, and Hens and Bucks.
Avalon Airport
Near Lara

Avalon Airport

Avalon Airport is Melbourne's newest airport specialising in domestic flights across Australia. Choose Avalon Airport, the Melbourne airport where flying is made easy. There's no hassle getting there with a toll free car trip from Melbourne's city centre along an uncongested highway. Geelong and the Great Ocean Road are also just minutes away. The Airport Car Park is only metres from the terminal, and you can select from their convenient standard car park or their secure undercover Premium Parking service. Why not also give your car a holiday with one of the Vehicle Detailing or Servicing options from their VACC accredited mechanics. You could say that they are the Melbourne airport with less turbulence. Avalon Airport is Melbourne's easy way to fly.

Coastal Golf Victoria

Coastal Golf Victoria makes it easy for golfers to visit and access the amazing golf courses Victoria's Coast has to offer. Coastal Golf Victoria tours include premium courses on Torquay's Surfcoast, the Bellarine and Mornington Peninsula's, as well as those along the Great Ocean Road. Coastal Golf Victoria saves you the hassle of having to make numerous phone calls co-ordinating tee times, accommodation and transport services. Choose one of the tours on offer and let the team do the hard work, leaving you only to arrive and concentrate on your swing. If you have something specific in mind for your tour then visit the website and complete an online questionnaire about what you are looking for. Coastal Golf Victoria can arrange an all inclusive package to suit your needs and budget. With an abundance of premium courses and accommodation venues, as well as iconic tourist destinations to see, Victoria's Coast is the perfect place for an unforgettable golfing experience. Visit the website and let Coastal Golf Victoria take care of your next golfing holiday.

Geelong Adventure Specialists

Welcome to Geelong Adventure Specialists, number one on Trip Advisor (for outdoor activities). They specialise in high quality private adventures and tours for anyone or any group. Their focus is on the seasonal outdoor activities. Currently it is land-based activities and tours locally, and activity specific trips further afield. If you are keen for a challenge, a fun day with friends, or just some time out in one of the many diverse and beautiful natural places in the region, Geelong Adventure Specialists will take care of everything. Are you ready for some fun? Contact Geelong Adventure Specialists for further information.

Geelong Wine Region

Whether it is the distinctive maritime flavours of The Bellarine, the ancient richness of the Moorabool Valley Wine Region or the rugged, exposed coastline of the Surf Coast, the Geelong Wine Region is united by boutique, family owned winegrowers producing premium quality hand crafted wines. With each sub region and winery displaying their own unique characteristics, visitors are invited to explore the diversity of the Geelong Wine Region's stunning scenery, touring routes and restaurants whilst sampling some of Victoria's finest cellar door experiences. Geelong's family owned boutique operators maximise their wine's potential by hand pruning, hand picking and hand crafting their wines allowing regional characters to develop. Areas within the region have varying microclimates influencing the depth of colour, bouquet and flavour of the wines. The Bellarine has a maritime climate with bay breeezes and spectacular views, whilst the hills and valleys of the Moorabool Valley – Anakie areas have a warm, continental style climate. The renowned Surf Coast is famous for its long summer days and cooling ocean breezes. James Halliday in his Wine Atlas of Australia and New Zealand wrote: "If there is a unifying feature in all of the Geelong wines, it is their strength and depth of colour, bouquet and flavour." Not only does the Geelong wine region produce some of Australia's best wines, but the wineries are surrounded by some of Victoria's best scenery and touring opportunities. The Geelong Wine Region. Fine wines – from our hands to yours. For a map of the winery region visit: http://www.winegeelong.com.au/wine_region/map

Bellarine Taste Trail

The Bellarine Taste Trail is a collection of gourmet delights and foodie experiences all within 20 minutes of each other. The trail twists a scenic path around The Bellarine, taking visitors to vineyards that are receiving some of Australia’s highest accolades for their wine and farms that have changed the local restaurant scene with their amazing produce. There are breweries using innovative techniques for original flavours and bakeries known for amazing wood-fired bread and multi-award winning pies. Several tour companies run charter operations across the Bellarine, so you can truly indulge in all the Bellarine Taste Trail has to offer and let someone else worry about transport and navigation. The Bellarine is bounded by Port Phillip Bay to the North and Bass Strait to the South – as such, the seafood on offer is amazing. Portarlington’s mussels are well known locally and feature in a different dish at virtually every restaurant in the region. Places to eat range from those with stunning water views, or nestled in rolling farmland hills to exquisite and grand historic hotel dining rooms. They all offer their unique take on local fare. For more casual meals, pick up a bounty of local produce from one of the provedores and food stores around the Bellarine and make it yourself – either at home or at your holiday accommodation.

Eastern Beach

The art-deco swimming enclosure at Eastern Beach has been a Geelong favourite for generations. Built in the 1930’s, the ‘Promenade’ is a wooden structure built in an arc, great for walking on a warm evening. The swimming area also has a large tower and diving boards. There is a separate children’s pool that is enclosed and paved. On shore, there is a fantastic adventure playground with plenty of spectator seats for the grown ups. There are large areas of lawn perfect for picnics or, depending on the season, a kick of the football or a game of cricket. There are toilet and dressing room facilities, and the beach is patrolled by lifesavers during summer. There is also a restaurant / café / kiosk on site. The whole area is set amongst grassy hills and enormous trees, and several of the buildings in the precinct are listed on the Victorian Heritage Register.

ex HMAS Canberra

The ex HMAS Canberra dive site is the first artificial reef specifically created for diving in Victoria. It lies in approximately 28 metres of water, with the top of the mast about 5 metres below the surface at low tide. The site provides opportunities for divers with varying levels of experience and certification, from open water level certificates to advanced wreck divers, to enjoy this site. When the ship as prepared for scuttling many of the original working features were retained so divers still get a sense of being on board a working ship. Dive charter operators based at Queenscliff Harbour can lead trips to dive the ex HMAS Canberra.

Pakington Street

Pakington Street (or ‘Pako’ to locals) is a vibrant, cosmopolitan mix of shopping and eating out. Food and drink ranges from casual coffee shops with al fresco facilities and pubs with bistros to trendy bars and top class restaurants. Fashion stores, boutique giftware, specialty stores and gourmet groceries make up the eclectic mix of shops. You are likely to finish your day with a killer pair of heels and a bag of locally grown gourmet tomatoes.

Geelong Shopping

As Victoria’s largest regional town, there are loads of shopping options in Geelong. The central city area has a high concentration of malls with major department stores and chains, as well as a good mix of specialty shops and independent boutiques. There are fairly large-scale shopping centres in major suburbs such as Belmont, Waurn Ponds and Corio. Pakington Street, running through Newtown and Geelong West, is vibrant and fashionable. Shops here tend to be independent and perfect for finding on-trend fashion or unique homewares.

Geelong Waterfront

Building their city on a North-facing bay was a stroke of genius for the forefathers of Geelong. Generations later, residents and visitors alike are enjoying the benefits of the area collectively known as 'The Waterfront'. Stretching from Eastern Beach around to Rippleside, the area incorporates many restaurants and cafes on the water's edge. There are places for kids to play, from open grassy areas to some of the biggest and best playgrounds in the region. There are kids attractions including the carousel, a miniature train ride and a skate park. Seasonally there are also bungee trampolines and a giant ferris wheel. Childrens attractions, open public space, a lively calendar of events and fabulous places to eat and drink make the Waterfront a Geelong must-do.

Queenscliff Heritage Walk

Stroll the beautiful Heritage town of Queenscliff and enjoy afternoon tea at one of Queenscliff’s grand old buildings to finish. Guided walks run 2.00pm every Saturday and take approximately one and a quarter hours. Group walks available at other times by appointment. Check with the Visitor Information Centre for availability and prices. Bookings essential – Phone the Queenscliffe Visitor Information Centre 5258 4843 or call in to the Centre 55 Hesse Street Queenscliff. A self guided booklet, “Queenscliff – A Living Heritage.” Is also available for sale from the Queenscliffe Visitor Information Centre. This short self guided walk will take approximately 45 minutes and take you past a few of the town’s historic buildings.

Queenscliff Shopping

Shopping in Queenscliff is a majestic experience. Many of the fashion boutiques, antique stores, provedores and other shops in central Queenscliff are housed within glorious Victorian era buildings and have retained the sense of grandeur associated with their surrounds. Hesse Street is the main street, but there are several crossroads worth exploring to find some hidden treasures. As well as the strip shopping in Hesse Street and surrounds, the new Queenscliff Harbour development houses a range of new retailers including fashion and homewares.

Rippleside

The Rippleside foreshore reserve in Geelong’s Northern suburbs is best known as the home of the Geelong Community Adventure Playground. The wooden playground offers a great range of equipment for children of all ages and abilities. There are also public toilets, picnic and BBQ facilities at the park, as well as a great expanse of grassed area perfect for ball sports, kites or just a run-around.

Rockpool Ramble at Point Lonsdale

At low tide the sandstone platform just below the lighthouse in the Point Lonsdale Marine Reserve is the perfect place to explore the rockpools. The water is crystal clear and an amazing range of marine wildlife and plants are visible. There are also reefs just offshore that are ideal for divers and snorkelers.

St Leonards Beach

At Indented Head, the coast turns and runs due south for 3 km down to the low bluffs at St Leonards. The Esplanade runs right behind the beach and low foredune. There are two picnic areas behind the main beach, with a camping reserve toward St Leonards, and a foreshore reserve with numerous facilities backing the bluffs and St Leonards Pier Beach. Toward the southern end of St Leonards Beach, there are several wooden groynes, as well as the breakwater and pier, that form the boundary with the 300 m long St Leonards Pier Beach. This beach terminates at a low, rocky point and reef flats. Both beaches are low and narrow and fronted by shallow, 100 to 200 m wide sand flats, containing low amplitude bars and runnels. The flats are exposed at low tide. Swimming Two relatively safe beaches fronted by shallow sand flats and low bars. Bathing is better at mid to high tide when the flats are covered. Surfing None. Fishing The rocks on the south side of Indented Head and the St Leonards Pier are the two best places to reach deeper water. General A long, relatively natural beach, with good access and numerous facilities, plus the small town of St Leonards at the southern end. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 2 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

The Rip

The Rip is the treacherous stretch of water at Port Phillip Heads where the relative calm of Port Phillip Bay meets the unbridled wild of Bass Strait. The tidal flows between the two bodies of water through the narrow opening generates a path through the sea that is notoriously difficult to navigate and highly dangerous. Ships passing through the heads still use the Port Phillip Sea Pilot service, a group of highly experienced local seamen who are familiar with the conditions and difficulties of The Rip. All ships bound for Geelong and Melbourne pass through Port Phillip Heads, and the Rip view lookout has an elevated position to watch those ships enter and exit the bay.

Golden Plains Farmers Market

Come and taste the real food and produce from the farms and vineyards of Golden Plains and Moorabool Valley. Fresh from the farm, sold by the farmers. The award winning Golden Plains Farmers’ Market is authentic and accredited, held in the heart of Bannockburn just 20 minutes from Geelong. Held on the first Saturday, every month, every season, from 9am to 1pm—you can start at the farmers’ market then spend the day touring Golden Plains.

Geelong Walking Tours

Start your trip to Geelong with a guided walk where you will visit the key attractions, the arts precinct and our stunning Waterfront. Get some inspiration for the remainder of your stay and even some discounts. Walks depart from the National Wool Museum, Cnr Brougham & Moorabool St. The 2 hour walk costs $12 and includes a delicious morning or afternoon tea hosted by Novotel Geelong on the spectacular Waterfront. Bookings are essential - 03 5244 7102.

Diving

The Point Lonsdale component of the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park includes spectacular deep water scenery comprising cliffs, caverns, rocky reef walls, sponge gardens and kelp beds. The Rip side of Point Lonsdale contains an extensive intertidal rocky platform covered with algae such as Neptune's Necklace, and has a number of larger rockpools suitable for snorkelling. The Point Lonsdale intertidal platform has the highest recorded invertebrate diversity of any calcarenite reef in Victoria. The reefs offshore from Point Lonsdale provide spectacular underwater terrain with ledges, rock outcrops and bommies, and beds of bull kelp on sections exposed to large waves. The channel between the main rock platform and the outer reef is around 20 metres wide and 2- 4metres deep and contains a small forest of Giant Kelp, a species which is showing signs of decline along the south east coast of Australia. The Lonsdale Wall is a series of ledges that mark the edge of the historical course of the Yarra River. The wall drops down a series of ledges from 15 to 90 metres depth, extending horizontally for about a kilometre. The vertical walls, sheltered caves, ledges and overhangs and their associated communities of colourful sponges, fish and encrusting algae provide spectacular scenery and are popular dive sites. The species diversity in this area is very high, including more than 43 species of fish. The Kelp Beds are areas with reefs that previously supported Giant Kelp forests and are now dominated by leather kelp. These kelps grow attached to shallow rocky reefs and provides shelter for communities of algae, fish, encrusting sponges, and numerous seastars and sea urchins. The Sponge Gardens contains a high diversity of sponges and other filter feeding invertebrates in a variety of colours, shapes and forms. Being in the main flow of current through the Rip, these animals are able to extract plankton from the water that passes by. The area derives its name from the spectacular and diverse sponges, branching soft corals, stalked ascidians and carpets of colourful anemones.

Point Lonsdale Beach

Point Lonsdale forms the western side of Port Phillip Heads, with The Rip separating it from Point Nepean. The town of Point Lonsdale has a protected bay beach and more exposed ocean beaches. The main ocean beach is known as the Surf or Back Beach and is the site of Point Lonsdale Surf Life Saving Club, founded in 1947. A walking track leads from the surf club over the dunes to the beach. Surf Beach extends for 900 m from a wide, intertidal rock platform, located just east of the surf lifesaving club, to where more rocks and reefs outcrop in the surf. In fact, low tide rock flats dominate this beach and are clearly visible at low tide. The beach faces south-west and receives waves averaging 1.4 m, which produce a single attached bar, cut by strong rips every 250 m. In addition, strong permanent rips run out against some of the reefs, the worst being The Escalator to the left of the club house. These rips have been responsible for many rescues, with an average of 30 each year. There have also been drownings at the beach, so be very wary and stay between the flags. Swimming A moderately hazardous beach owing to the moderate waves and strong permanent and shifting rips, together with rocks and reefs. Definitely stay on the bars, clear of the rips and rocks and between the flags. Surfing Beach breaks are common over the numerous reefs, with the best known as Glaneuses, located at the end of Glaneuse Road, and adjacent to The Escalator rip. It offers a good left over the reef. Surfing is best with northerly winds, a low to moderate swell at mid to high tide, as the reefs are exposed at low tide. Fishing A popular spot offering permanent rips and gutters, particularly adjacent to the reefs and rocks. General This is the surf beach for the popular Point Lonsdale holiday town and very popular with bathers in summer and surfers year round. However it is a hazardous beach with strong permanent rips, so use extreme care. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 8 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Point Lonsdale Lighthouse

The Point Lonsdale Lighthouse is on the Western side of Port Phillip Heads overlooking the Rip and all seaborne traffic bound for Melbourne passes by it. Whilst signals have operated on this point since 1852, the current concrete towers was built in 1902. The lighthouse precinct, including nearby military defence structure, is registered with Heritage Victoria. The area around the base of the lighthouse is accessible to the public and tours of the interior are conducted by the Queenscliff Maritime Museum most Sundays and at various holiday times throughout the year.

Point Lonsdale Playground

Adjacent to the front beach in Point Lonsdale is a fantastic adventure playground for kids of all ages. The park is well shaded and has toilets, BBQ, seating and parking nearby.

Food & Wine

Whilst it was put on the foodie map by its famous mussels, Portarlington has much more to tantalise your taste buds these days. As a central point to many of the attractions on the Bellarine Taste Trail, Portarlington is a great spot to base a gourmet tour of the surrounding region. In town you'll have access to top class restaurants and cafes, locally grown produce and one of the best bakeries in the region. In the surrounding hills you can explore award-winning wineries or buy food direct from the grower.

Portarlington Beach

Point Richards is a large accumulation of sand that forms the northern tip of the Bellarine Peninsula. The point is still growing slowly to the west, while in the east it is attached to the bedrock at Portarlington. There are three beaches along this 2.5 km section of coast. The first is a 300 m long, low energy section west of the point, which grades into tidal flats. Between the point and the Portarlington Jetty is a 2 km long, north facing beach, backed by a large reserve and a caravan park. The third beach runs for 200 m east of the jetty to the bluffs. All three beaches have good access, with a large car park on the point servicing a boat ramp, and a second boat ramp on Portarlington Beach. Swimming These are three relatively safe beaches, with usually calm to low wave conditions. Due to the extensive sand flats, bathing is best at mid to high tide. However, watch the boat traffic near the boat ramps and jetty. Surfing None. Fishing The jetty is the most popular location. General A very popular section of coast, particularly during the summer holidays when the backing caravan park is full. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 200 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 1 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Boating in Portarlington

There are several places to launch a boat in Portarlington and surrounding areas. The Point Richards boat ramp, just west of town, has just been upgraded. It is now a safer facility with two lanes, able to take larger scale boats and is close to King George Whiting and snapper grounds. Other nearby boat ramps include those at St Leonards, Indented Head and Clifton Springs.

Fishing in Portarlington

The Portarlington Pier is a popular fishing spot. The main pier runs North-South and at the end a breakwater runs East-West. It is a good spot to catch salmon. Mullet, garfish and trevally are often caught in the harbour and squid can be caught on the Western side. Boat ramps in the area can launch anglers into the bay and hooking snapper, whiting, flathead and sharks.

Portarlington Pier

The Pier, a working harbour, houses the town’s mussel fleet, so it’s not unusual to see crews setting out for or returning from harvesting Blue Mussels grown in farms just offshore in Port Phillip Bay. Portarlington has become famous for its mussels, and you can buy them direct from the farmer in town, often on the pier straight from the boat.

Princess Park

Just behind the dunes in Queenscliff, Princess Park is a central point for much activity in Queenscliff. The site of regular community markets, the venue for the annual Queenscliff Music Festival and an institution with local and visiting families who have spent hours playing, picnicking and relaxing in the shade of its tall trees. There is a fantastic new playground within the park, and it is adjacent to the new Queenscliff Harbour and the ferry terminal.

Food & Wine

With beautifully maintained historic buildings and world class dining, Queenscliff is a great spot for any dining experience - from a 5-star luxurious experience to fish and chips with the family. Cafes along Hesse St in Queenscliff are in good supply and offer a fabulous variety of gourmet treats and freshly cooked meals. Pop into one of them for a coffee as you sit back and soak up the scenery of the bustling Hesse Street. Particular dining highlights in Queenscliff are restaurants such as Athelstane House, Apostle Queenscliff, Gusto, the Queenscliff Hotel and the Vue Grand Hotel. These historic buildings, along with a number of others house world class chefs and offer customers a truly luxurious experience. Smaller restaurants along Hesse Street are also popular for dinner and ensure that all tastes - and budgets - are catered for.

Bellarine Railway

The railway hugs the water around scenic Swan Bay providing breathtaking views, before climbing through the rolling hills of the Bellarine Peninsula to Drysdale. Enjoy the new Bike Hire and Park & Ride experience. Leave the car at Drysdale, travel by train to Queenscliff. Spend a pleasant afternoon exploring this historic seaside town, enjoying fine food, or simply picnicing at the beach; then return by train in the late afternoon. Visit www.bpr.org.au for more information about news and events.

Queenscliff Beach

Queenscliff Beach fronts the town of the same name. It is 800 m long, faces south-east, and is backed by a large foreshore reserve with numerous facilities. The Queenscliff harbour channel and breakwater form the northern boundary, with the vegetated slopes of 20 m high Shortland Bluff forming the southern boundary. Two long jetties cross the beach, one servicing the passenger ferry to Portsea; and the other is the old Pilot Jetty. There are several boat sheds below the bluffs and the Queenscliff Lighthouse on top of Shortland Bluff. The beach is low and flat, with a continuous, wide, shallow bar and no rips. Shallow reef flats extend east of the bluff. Swimming A relatively safe beach with a wide shallow bar. Surfing None. Fishing The harbour channel, the two jetties and the seawall round the base of the Bluff all provide excellent fishing locations. General A very accessible beach, with numerous facilities in the foreshore reserve and the attractive town of Queenscliff behind. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 2 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life. Beach

Geelong Botanic Gardens

The Geelong Botanic Gardens are a wonderful mix of old and new featuring traditional heritage gardens as well as the contemporary and waterwise 21st Century garden. The gardens were established in 1851 and as such feature fabulous mature trees, including some rare and exotic. Within the 17 acre space there are rose gardens, shaded lawn areas perfect for picnics, a teahouse. There are also regular guided walks exploring different aspects of the gardens and special interest areas.

Geelong Playspace

The Geelong Playspace is a special playground. Located in the heart of Eastern Park and with views to Corio Bay, the multi-award winning design integrates accessible playground activities into the overall playground. The area caters for children of a wide range of abilities and a great cross section of age groups. The ‘Liberty Swing’ – which provides children in a wheelchair the experience of a playground swing – requires a key, which can be collected from either the National Wool Museum in Moorabool Street or The Carousel on the Waterfront.

Eastern Park

Eastern Park is 185 acres of sporting facilities, walking tracks, parkland and recreation space. Located on the edge of the Geelong CBD and bordering the Geelong Waterfront precinct, it’s a fantastic spot to enjoy fresh air and outdoor activity. The gravel track around the park is used by many locals for jogging, walking and cycling. There are 5 hard wicket cricket ovals as well as pavilions, BBQs and playgrounds, including the award winning Geelong Playspace.

Baywalk Bollards

104 bollards line the arc of Waterfront Geelong from Limeburners Point to Rippleside. Artist Jan Mitchell transformed the old timber pier pylons into this colourful piece of public art. Each bollard represents a different character from Geelong's history, from the Wauthaurong and together they tell a fascinating story. Further information and a booklet is available at local Visitor Information Centres.

Breamlea

Breamlea is a small holiday settlement lying between the banks of Thompson Creek and Breamlea Beach. The beach faces south-south-east and runs for 2 km from the low basalt rocks at Noble Rocks to the mouth of the creek at Point Impossible. There is road access to the back of the fore dunes, with foot tracks crossing the 20 m high fore dune to reach the beach. The beach receives waves averaging just over 1 m, which usually produce an attached bar cut by rips every 250 m. At the creek mouth, both a tidal channel and shoals are present. Swimming A moderately hazardous beach, owing to the persistent rips and creek mouth. Stay on the attached section of the bars and clear of the rips, rocks and creek. Surfing Usually low to moderate beach breaks along the length of the beach. Fishing This beach has rocks at one end, the creek at the other and usually rip holes and gutters along the beach. General A natural beach, mainly used by the Breamlea locals for bathing, surfing and fishing. SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.
Clifton Springs Beach
Near Werribee

Clifton Springs Beach

The Clifton Springs section of coast is characterised by near continuous bluffs averaging 20m high, and is fronted by a narrow, crenulate beach and wide sand flats. The first section lies to the immediate west of the boat ramp, which provides the best access, and has 400m wide sand flats. The central section is the site of the main Clifton Springs recreational beach. It is the most popular of the northern Bellarine Peninsula beaches. It is located below 20 m high bluffs and is backed by an extensive foreshore reserve, with ample parking and picnic facilities. Most facilities and parking are on the bluffs, with more limited facilities at the beach. The narrow, 500 m long beach faces north-west and is fronted by tidal flats that extend several hundred metres into the bay. The width of the flats can be gauged by the length of the ruins of the 400m long jetty. The eastern beach is a 5km long, narrow, crenulate beach lying below the bluffs, which slowly decrease in height to the east. It fronts the Clifton Springs golf course and terminates 1 km west of Point Richards. While all of this beach is backed by a foreshore reserve, access is limited to the golf course or Beacon Point Road and bluff-top Water Drive. It has no facilities. Swimming Three relatively safe beaches, with best bathing on the main beach at mid to high tide. Surfing None. Fishing Only at high tide from the beach. General A usually quiet section of coast with the main beach being the most accessible and popular. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 50 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 1 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life. Beach

Food & Shopping

The main road through Drysdale, the Geelong Portarlington Road features shops, cafes and historic buildings. The Drysdale Community Craft shop has local, mostly hand-made products and is also home to a small visitor information outlet. Turning left into Wyndham Street, or up Clifton Springs Road and left into Hancock Street again presents many more shopping choices, from antiques to the supermarket. Turning right into Murradoc Road is a more industrial area, but with an excellent seafood shop.

Bellarine Railway

The railway hugs the water around scenic Swan Bay providing breathtaking views, before climbing through the rolling hills of the Bellarine Peninsula between Queenscliff and Drysdale. Trains operate on Sundays and additional days during Summer and school holiday periods. Visit www.bpr.org.au for further timetable information, news and events.

Jerringot Wetlands Geelong

Jerringot Wetland is a freshwater marsh within Belmont Common and is part of the Barwon River's natural floodplain. It is a surprising sanctuary for wildlife within an urban setting. Over 120 species of birds visit or live at Jerringot through the year. The internationally significant Latham’s Snipe fly 20,000km from Japan to south eastern Australia and can be found in good numbers during spring and summer. Other significant species include the Australian Shoveler, Hardhead, Baillion’s Crake, Cattle Egret, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper and Great Egret. It is an excellent habitat for frogs, including the endangered Growling Grass Frog. Native fish such as Common and Spotted Galaxias and the rare Australian mudfish find a home in the waters as well as many aquatic plant species. River Red Gum, River Bottlebrush and Teatree, as well as thickets of Tangled Lignum fringe the river side of the wetland.

Johnstone Park

Located on the Western edge of the city centre and adjacent to the Geelong Railway Station, Johnstone Park is a glorious green space, with mature trees, grassed lawn areas and a heritage bandstand. The Little Malop Street edge of the park is an arts and culture precinct within Geelong and home to the Geelong Gallery, Geelong Regional Library, Geelong Performing Arts Centre, and the Geelong Heritage Centre.

Kardinia Park

Just South of the Geelong CBD, Kardinia Park is most famous for its AFL Champion tenants, the Geelong Cats. Simonds Stadium, the Geelong Football Club home ground, is on the Eastern side of Kardinia Park. The stadium seats 28,300 people and hosts AFL matches during winter and a range of other sporting events at other times during the year. Kardinia Park is also home to Kardinia Swimming Pool, which operates with seasonal hours between October and April. With two Olympic sized swimming pools, several childrens’ pools, two diving boards (1m and 3m) and a waterslide. Also within the bounds of the park are a childrens’ playground, fitness circuit, cricket and football ovals, netball courts and walking / running / riding tracks.

Moorabool Valley Wine Region

The Moorabool Valley is one of Australia’s finest and most awarded cool climate wine regions. Bannockburn is the gateway to the Moorabool Valley Wine Region and is located less than an hours drive from Melbourne and 20 minutes from Geelong. Boutique wineries producing hand crafted wines are forging an international reputation for the Moorabool Valley. The Moorabool Valley is a sub region of Victoria's highly regarded Geelong Wine Region. Wineries in the Moorabool Valley region include Austins Wines, Bannockburn Vineyard, Clyde Park Vineyard and Lethbridge Wines.

Ocean Grove - Collendina Beach

Collendina Beach occupies most of the open bay between Point Lonsdale and Barwon Heads. It is 6 km long, extending from the reefs west of Point Lonsdale Beach to 1 km west of the Collendina Beach car park. The only public access is at the car park, together with tracks over the foredune from the caravan park. The beach faces south-south-east and for the most part is backed by 10 to 20 m high, vegetated dunes, with a few blowouts. It receives waves averaging between 1 and 1.5 m, which break over a wide, low gradient surf zone and occasional reefs and rocks. Persistent rips occur every 250 m, with some permanent rips against the more prominent reefs. During bigger seas, waves break on outer, deeper reefs. Swimming Be careful on this beach as there are usually deep rip holes and strong currents along the beach. Stay inshore on the attached section of the bars and well clear of the rips and reefs. Surfing There are many beach and a few reef breaks along the beach, with best conditions in a low to moderate swell and northerly winds. Fishing There are excellent persistent rip holes and occasional gutters along the beach, plus some occasional reefs. General A long relatively natural beach offering plenty of sand, a low gradient inner surf for bathing, rip holes for fishing and numerous beach breaks for surfing. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 200 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Ocean Grove Beach

Ocean Grove Beach is located in the centre of the 9.5 km long beach that curves in a broad, south facing arc from Point Lonsdale to the Barwon River mouth. The Ocean Grove section is 2 km long and faces south-east. Some protection is offered by Barwon Heads and the beach receives waves averaging 1.4m. These waves interact with the fine beach sand to produce a wide, low gradient beach face, fronted by a 300m wide surf zone that contains strong rips every 250m. During moderate waves, the rips increase in size and intensity toward Collendina, while decreasing toward Barwon Heads. At low tide, the beach and exposed bar can be over 100 m wide, with the deeper rip channels clearly visible. The town of Ocean Grove backs the beach, with a wide, well-arranged foreshore reserve between the town and the beach. It provides extensive parking, together with most beach amenities. The good parking and easy access, together with the surf club patrols and slightly lower waves make this a popular summer beach. The Ocean Grove Surf Life Saving Club was formed in 1948 and performs an average of 8 rescues each year. Swimming A moderately safe beach, particularly during average summer conditions, when extensive bars dominate. Best at high tide, however watch the rips, particularly at low tide. Best to stay between the flags. Surfing Usually has wide, moderate to low beach breaks; more popular with summer surfers. Fishing Best to go up the beach away from the summer crowds, and where rip holes are more common. General A popular summer beach, which can hold a large crowd. It has a wide, shallow surf zone with rips increasing up the beach, so it is best to stay near the surf club and bathe in the patrolled area. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 200 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Ocean Grove Nature Reserve

The Ocean Grove Nature Reserve is the only preserved native woodland on the Bellarine Peninsula. Home to 178 species of native plants, including 22 orchids, the reserve is an important tract of land. Wildlife within the reserve includes wallabies, echidnas, possums and koalas. There are also snakes and lizards, as well as some 167 species of bird recorded as being spotted within the reserve.

Shopping

The Terrace Shopping You can buy just about anything along the main street of Ocean Grove. If you're after an outfit, there's surfwear shops, women's fashion stores, men's clothing stores, and a shoe shop. Jewellery is available in many stores, from fine gold and silver to funky beads and chunky chains. Gorgeous children's clothes can also be found at various shops, and the toy shop will keep the kids amused for a long while. Whatever you are after there's no doubt you'll find something you simply have to take home with you from Ocean Grove at one of the many delightful shops along The Terrace. Ocean Grove Marketplace Ocean Grove marketplace, first opened around summer 05/06, is a shopping complex just out of town on the way to Queenscliff. With gorgeous children's clothes, a relaxing day spa and bargains galore at the two dollar shop, the marketplace is becoming more and more popular as time goes by. Fast food restaurants are a hit with the younger generation, whilst the opening of Safeway here has provided competition for Coles as well as a stack of jobs for local high school students The marketplace is still relatively new and a great place to stop by and check out during your visit to Ocean Grove.

Barwon Grange

Barwon Grange is an elegant intact brick home dating from Geelong's earliest residential settlement. It was built in 1855 and reflects the aspirations of middle class businessman Jonathan Porter O'Brien and his family who had emigrated from Liverpool. The picturesque Gothic style architecture includes steep gables, unusual decorative timber bargeboards and veranda parapet. The interior contains a fine collection of early Victorian furniture and fittings faithfully accumulated according to an inventory compiled when the house was auctioned in 1856. The garden complements the house with a Victorian fountain. Lawns sloping down to the Barwon River are planted with species from a mid-19th century plant catalogue.

The Heights Heritage House and Garden

The Heights Heritage House and Garden dates back to the 1850s. The house was built in 1855 and is remarkable for being the largest (14 rooms) German, prefabricated house in Victoria. During the 1930s, the building was extensively altered to reflect contemporary taste although the extensive gardens, stables, outbuildings and water tower survive intact from the 19th century. The Heights retains a small collection of fine Georgian furniture collected by the last owners, Louis and Marnie Whyte. Early 1860s plantings still dominate this beautiful Geelong garden today and the aged oaks and conifers provide great delight to visitors.
Natural Treasures Tours
Near Werribee

Natural Treasures Tours

Australian Natural Treasures Touring believe the touring experience should not be rushed. Their personalised, small group tours, for two to ten people, are designed to showcase the regions natural beauty, history and wildlife. Natural Treasures Touring believe a relaxed touring pace with great food and accommodation while in the company of an friendly and professional guide is the best way to see this region. Taking extra time to see the Great Ocean Road will be a decision your will never regret. The most popular tour is their two day Great Ocean Road tour. The two days allow you to see far more than what a rushed day tour allows. The coastal road, koalas, kangaroos, beaches, rainforest and great accommodation with ocean views are first day highlights. The second days touring explores the shipwreck coast including the famous 12 Apostles, Loch Ard Gorge and London Bridge. When visiting Victoria spending two days on the Great Ocean Road is time very well spent. Natural Treasures Tours range in duration of one to three days and discover all regions of Victoria. All tours are conducted in small groups lead by expert guides providing a thorough and personalised experience. If you are heading off from Melbourne to South Australia, why not join the three day Melbourne to Adelaide tour or do it in reverse. They also offer a half-day city sights tour as well as various private touring options from Melbourne. Australian Natural Treasures Touring also operate school educational tours of one to three days. Using new, comfortable and air-conditioned vehicles for all tours as well as spectacular accommodation ensures your tour will be a special one. Natural Treasures Tours are happy to customise an itinerary for you. Please visit the website for more information.

Balyang Sanctuary Geelong

A haven for waterbirds and popular with picnicking families, Balyang Sanctuary is situated in Geelong suburb Newtown. The centrepiece of the nine hectare park is a lake with three islands – two connected by bridges and the third retained as a safe nesting place for native birds. Feathered residents at the sanctuary include swans, pelicans, Eurasian coot, dusky moorhen, Pacific black duck, mallard, pied cormorant, geese and silver gulls There are also shady grassed areas, picnic areas, a rotunda, free parking and public toilet facilities.

Food & Wine

Bustling with fashionable sippers and shoppers, the main street offers a variety of dining experiences from casual provedores and bakeries to fine restaurants or home-cooked take-away meals. MUST TRY: Annie's Provedore Peppercorn Foods Beach House Barwon Heads At The Heads Restaurant Barwon Heads Hotel Fish & chips on the beach

Beaches near Barwon Heads

At Barwon Heads, the coast trends due west for 7 km to Black Rocks. The first 2 km are dominated by calcarenite rocks and reefs, which outcrop on the beach and in the surf. These divide the coast into three beaches. The first (285) is below Point Finders and is a 50 m pocket of sand facing south-east and bordered by rock platforms and reefs. The two Barwon Heads beaches (286, 287) face south and are more exposed, with higher waves and patchy reefs. These conditions result in a wide, low gradient beach, rock flat and surf, with persistent and some permanent rips against the reefs. All three beaches are easily accessible. There is a car park and a lookout on Point Flinders, and car parks on the Torquay Road, which parallels the two Barwon Heads beaches. Swimming Point Flinders is relatively safe close inshore, however there are rocks and reefs off the beach. The Barwon Heads beaches are both potentially hazardous, owing to the higher waves, reefs and strong permanent rips. Surfing There are several breaks along this section, mostly reef breaks that work best at higher tide, with a low to moderate swell and north winds. Those immediately west of Point Flinders are called The Hole. Fishing There are excellent rip holes and gutters next to the reefs, together with rocks and reefs to fish from at low tide. General A reef dominated section of coast, most suitable for beach fishing and experienced surfers. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Barwon Heads Bluff

The tidal flows at the mouth of the Barwon River have created an amazing landscape at the Barwon Heads Bluff. It is one of the best spots in the region to observe marine life in rockpools. More than 90% of the creatures found at the Bluff are only found in Southern Australia and nowhere else in the world. The Bluff has an enormous diversity of seaweeds from tiny encrusting pink coralline algae to mighty forests of giant and bull kelps. There are many different species of fish, snails, seastars, and other invertebrates that all make the Barwon Bluff Marine Sanctuary their home. The high lookout at the bluff has views towards Port Phillip Heads to the east and along the Surf Coast to the West.

Barwon Heads Bridge

The Barwon Heads Bridge is a road connecting Barwon Heads and Ocean Grove. The deteriorating 100+ year old bridge has been reconstructed in recent years and a second bridge has been built alongside to take pedestrian traffic, cyclists and recreational anglers.

Shopping

Whether it's children's wear, a new surfboard or headwear for the Spring Racing Carnival, Barwon Heads has something to offer. There are famous surf shops, while many boutiques sell stylish clothes and homewares. Retail therapy musts: FRITH Kiitos Living by Design Moss Industry

Thirteenth Beach Barwon Heads

Thirteenth Beach is part of the 7 km long section of coast between Barwon Heads and Black Rock. It occupies the western 4.5 km and faces essentially due south. The beach receives waves averaging 1.5 m, is moderately sloping and is fronted by a single bar, dominated by rips every 250 m. The beach is backed by a vegetated foredune for most of its length, and the Barwon Heads to Torquay Road. The best access is provided at the surf lifesaving club, with additional car parks and access tracks located along the road. The surf club, founded in 1961, is the only development on what is a relatively natural beach. Its members rescue 5 people on average each year. Swimming Rips are a common feature of the beach, with safest bathing on the bars in the patrolled area. Strong permanent rips lie east of the surf club. The western end is adjacent to the Black Rock sewer outlet and should be avoided. Surfing A popular surfing beach with low to moderate swell providing numerous beach breaks, all readily accessible from the main road. One of the more popular areas is in front of the shipping beacon, known as The Beacon. Best with northerly winds. Fishing A good, natural spot for beach fishing, with good road access to the numerous rip holes that persist along the beach. General A relatively undeveloped beach, more popular with surfers and bathers who want a patrolled beach away from the crowds. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 50 General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Barwon River

From its beginnings in the Otway Ranges, the Barwon River winds its way through suburban Geelong before flowing into the ocean at Barwon Heads. The mouth of the river has sandy banks that are popular with walkers and families having a paddle or building sandcastles. Fishing is popular on the jetties near the mouth of the river and kayakers and paddlers are often seen in this area. Barwon Heads has a sailing club where laser yachts are often seen at high tide. There are also BBQs and picnic areas alongside the riverbank.

Barwon River Geelong

From its beginnings in the Otway Ranges, the Barwon River winds its way through suburban Geelong before flowing into the ocean at Barwon Heads. The Barwon River is the site for a huge number of leisure pursuits for Geelong residents. There are several rowing clubs located in Belmont, and a little further south there is an area for waterskiing. At various points along the river as it runs through Geelong there are tracks for running, cycling and walking. There are also several parks, playgrounds, picnic spots and BBQ areas. The mouth of the river has sandy banks that are well used walkers and families who build sandcastles and paddle in the shallows. Fishing is popular on the jetties near the mouth of the river and kayakers and paddlers are often seen in this area. Barwon Heads also has a sailing club where laser yachts are often seen at high tide. There are also BBQs and picnic areas alongside the riverbank.

Bellarine Golf

The Bellarine really is paradise for golfers. With four courses inside the top fifty public access courses in Australia for 2012 (as rated by Ausgolf), it is an ideal destination to pack the clubs and try your hand at some of the most challenging and breathtaking courses in the country. In addition to these nationally renowned links courses, there are several tree lined country courses that welcome casual players.

Bellarine Rail Trail

The Bellarine Rail Trail is a disused railway corridor has been reborn as a 32km walking/cycling path linking the outskirts of Geelong with the coast at the historic village of Queenscliff. The Bellarine Rail Trail mostly follows the reserve of the old Geelong-Queenscliff railway, established in 1879 to service the military fort at Queenscliff. The railway soon became a popular service with visitors heading to the coastal holiday resort, an alternative to the bay paddle steamers. Eventually, diminishing freight and a lack of patronage saw the service finally closed in 1976. The rail trail begins near the Geelong Showgrounds, about one kilometre from the South Geelong railway station and ends near the historic Queenscliff railway station. It is mainly flat, with some short, steep climbs up from Leopold toward Curlewis and Drysdale. Steam trains still run on the section between Queenscliff and Drysdale. The Bellarine Peninsula Railway's vintage trains carry passengers on Sundays and public holidays. There are many access points to the trail and bay scenery and birdlife are some of the highlights. In the future, it is planned to link the trail with the Barwon River trail network and Eastern Park.

Bellarine Rail Trail

The Bellarine Rail Trail is a disused railway corridor has been reborn as a 32km walking/cycling path linking the outskirts of Geelong with the coast at the historic village of Queenscliff. The Bellarine Rail Trail mostly follows the reserve of the old Geelong-Queenscliff railway, established in 1879 to service the military fort at Queenscliff. The railway soon became a popular service with visitors heading to the coastal holiday resort, an alternative to the bay paddle steamers. Eventually, diminishing freight and a lack of patronage saw the service finally closed in 1976. The rail trail begins near the Geelong Showgrounds, about one kilometre from the South Geelong railway station and ends near the historic Queenscliff railway station. It is mainly flat, with some short, steep climbs up from Leopold toward Curlewis and Drysdale. Steam trains still run on the section between Queenscliff and Drysdale. The Bellarine Peninsula Railway's vintage trains carry passengers on Sundays and public holidays. There are many access points to the trail and bay scenery and birdlife are some of the highlights. In the future, it is planned to link the trail with the Barwon River trail network and Eastern Park.
152 km Geelong / Lorne Return Ride
Near Geelong

152 km Geelong / Lorne Return Ride

Features:

Spectacular ocean views on the Great Ocean Road. Good hills to and from Lorne. Roads generally quiet midweek and out of school holidays.
 

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Packages & Offers

High Tea on the High Seas - Searoad Ferries

Experience High Tea on the High Seas in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge on board the Queenscliff Sorrento Ferry.

Blues Train & BIG 4 Beacon Resort - May and August

Enjoy the legendary Blues Train and the equally legendary BIG4 Beacon Resort with this package, from $497 for two people.

Family Supatramp & Stay Package at BIG4 Beacon Resort

Bring the kids and their bucketloads of energy to BIG 4 Beacon Resort with this Supatramp accommodation deal for 2 adults and 2 children, from $459.

High Tea on the High Seas - Searoad Ferries

Experience High Tea on the High Seas in the privacy of the Portsea Lounge on board the Queenscliff Sorrento Ferry.
Enjoy table service in elegant surroundings, exquisite food, quality tea and real coffee!

$40.00 per person and includes immediate return travel on the same ferry for a leisurely experience.

Every Sunday from February to November
12pm sailing from Sorrento
3pm sailing from Queenscliff.

To book visit www.searoad.com.au or contact 03 5258 3244

 

Blues Train & BIG 4 Beacon Resort - May and August

Enjoy the legendary Blues Train and the equally legendary BIG4 Beacon Resort with this package, from $497 for two people:

  • $40.00 per person and includes immediate return travel on the same ferry for a leisurely experience.
  • 2 nights accommodation.
  • Charcuterie Plate dinner and live band at Flying Brick Cider House, and a 1 litre cider ‘Growler’ to take home.
  • $50 voucher for Mud Day Spa, located at the resort.
  • Breakfast hamper.
  • Extend your stay with early check in (10am) and late check out (6pm).
  • P: 5258 1133 or book online

Only valid for Blues Train events in May and August 2015. Terms & conditions apply.

 

Family Supatramp & Stay Package at BIG4 Beacon Resort

Bring the kids and their bucketloads of energy to BIG 4 Beacon Resort with this Supatramp accommodation deal for 2 adults and 2 children, from $459.

  • 2 nights in a Queenscliff cabin.
  • A Supatramp pass for each child including an hour of clip ‘n climb and an hour of trampolining, plus socks and $10 to spend in the café.
  • 1 hour GoKart hire at the resort.
  • Unlimited DVD hire and a milkshake for each child from the resort shop.
  • Late 6pm checkout.
  • P: 1800 351 152 or book online

Offer available from 11 March to 30 April 2015. Terms and conditions apply.